September 3, 2010

Larry at the Mendenhall Glacier ice cave, originally uploaded by The Skillet Lickers.

A visitor at the Mendenhall Glacier ice cave in Alaska. Learn more here and read a first-hand account here.

Inspired by my friend K., currently in Juneau!

Enjoy today’s photo! If you like the photo, please drop a comment to the original photographer at Flickr.

September 2, 2010

AUG 17, originally uploaded by Chez Larsson.

Really loving this dragonfly shot by one of my favourite bloggers, Benita at Chez Larsson.

Enjoy today’s photo! If you like the photo, please drop a comment to the original photographer at Flickr.

August 31, 2010

Gargoyle Waterspout, originally uploaded by scilit.

A copper dragon gargoyle is a rainwater gutter at Flagler College in Florida. (The centerpiece of campus is Ponce de Leon Hall, built in 1888 as a luxury hotel, now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.)

Enjoy today’s photo! If you like the photo, please drop a comment to the original photographer at Flickr.

August 30, 2010

Come With Me to the Casbah, originally uploaded by Kenny Maths.

A blue doorway in Kasbah des Oudaias in Rabat, Morocco.

Enjoy today’s photo! If you like the photo, please drop a comment to the original photographer at Flickr.

August 27, 2010

Sardines (59), originally uploaded by jtresfon.

Dolphins contemplate a meal of sardines.

Enjoy today’s photo! If you like the photo, please drop a comment to the original photographer at Flickr.

August 26, 2010

Karnac, originally uploaded by Pablo Ramil.

Pillars at Karnak in Egypt. Technically called the Karnak Temple Complex which is made up of ruined temples, chapels, pylons, and other buildings about 500 km south of Cairo.

Wikipedia says: “One of most famous aspects of Karnak, is the Hypostyle Hall in the Precinct of Amun-Re, a hall area of 50,000 sq ft (5,000 m2) with 134 massive columns arranged in 16 rows. 122 of these columns are 10 meters tall, and the other 12 are 21 meters tall with a diameter of over three meters.

The architraves on top of these columns are estimated to weigh 70 tons. These architraves may have been lifted to these heights using levers. This would be an extremely time-consuming process and also would require great balance to get to such great heights. A common alternative theory about how they were moved is that there were large ramps made of sand mud brick or stone and the stones were towed up the ramps. If they used stone for the ramps they would have been able to build the ramps with much less material. The top of the ramps presumably would have either wooden tracks or cobblestones for towing the megaliths.” link to Wiki page

You can visit “digital Karnak” at this site run by UCLA.

Enjoy today’s photo! If you like the photo, please drop a comment to the original photographer at Flickr.

August 25, 2010

Philadelphia City Hall, originally uploaded by BostonCityWalk.

This is Philadelphia City Hall; construction begun in 1871.

Wikipedia tells us that “[at] 167 m (548 ft), including the statue, it is the world’s second-tallest masonry building” and that it was the tallest building in Pennsylvania until 1932.

The statue on the top is of city founder William Penn; Wiki says that the statue is 11.3-m (37 ft) tall and is “the tallest atop any building in the world.”

Enjoy today’s photo! If you like the photo, please drop a comment to the original photographer at Flickr.

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